New Look 6470

On Thursday, I finished my first knit skirt sufficiently to wear it to dance class. I was surprised how much I liked it, because I picked the pattern mainly to practice working with knits and using my new coverstitch machine, ie I made this skirt to build sewing skills rather than because I wanted to wear a skirt like this:

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The flounce moves very well when dancing, and the skirt is actually a flattering length for me (knit skirts in stores are overlong for me, dragging on the floor).

In the photo above, I paired the skirt with the v-neck top (Kwik Sew 3115) that I made from scrap fabric.

Here is New Look 6470, which is now out of print but was very popular for some time for the crossover and 6470 (1)cowl-neck tops. On PatternReview, there are over 70 reviews of this pattern, though few are of the skirt!

Here is my review:

Pattern Description:
Misses tops and skirt.

Pattern Sizing:
A (8-18). I sewed a size 14. I hesitated about what size to make and decided based on the listed finished garment hip size: 40.5″. My hips are 38″, and I decided I wanted some ease since I used a very lightweight knit and wanted to be able to move/dance in it.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes. This is a very simple, four seam skirt. Just two pattern pieces!

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
Likes

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I used a new technique for attaching waistband elastic. 

This skirt is extremely simple: four seams, waist elastic/casing, and a hem. Considering how simple it is, it is fairly flattering. I wore it to dance class, and got complemented on it: “Great dancing skirt!” It is also quite comfortable, moves well, and does not fit too snugly around the legs. The flounce moves very nicely when walking and dancing! Overall, a nicer skirt than I expected.

Dislikes
I don’t like running elastic through a casing, so I tried a new method for attaching the waistband, which is described second on this page. In short, I ignored the directions in the instructions, sewed the elastic into a circle, then stitched it to the top of the skirt (1/4″ below the top), stretching the elastic to fit. Then I folded the elastic into the skirt and used my coverstitch machine to stitch the elastic down. It was my first time using this method, and with some trial and error it turned out reasonably well.

I also hemmed using my new coverstitch machine, and followed a tip by happycamper on the Amazon review page for the Brother 2340CV. I did long straight stitch an inch from the bottom of the skirt, then used that basting thread as the “hinge” for pressing the hem up. Then, when stitching the hem with the coverstitch machine, I pulled gently on that basting thread to help the fabric feed evenly. The hem that resulted was just beautiful.

Fabric Used:
A lightweight, denim-look synthetic knit. It looks nice, but I wouldn’t buy it again because it develops pulls easily!

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I am proud of my neat hem, made with my new Brother 2340CV.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:
I didn’t make any alterations to the pattern. I did make a minor “design change”: I serged the flounce to the skirt pieces, but when I wore the skirt the first time, I managed to rip that seam by stepping on the skirt. Ooops. I reserged that seam, then I topstitched the the flounce to the skirt. That should give a little extra strength.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
I actually might! I’m not wild about elastic waistbands, but this skirt looks surprisingly nice, goes together easily, and is lovely to dance tango in. I dance a lot of tango, so it might be nice to have a couple simple, pretty long skirts.

Conclusion:
Super simple skirt, suitable for a beginner, that helped me learn several new skills. It moves well.

 

 

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